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Members of the Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM-CSIC) participating in the DTO-BioFlow project were among the attendees at the Ocean Decade Satellite Event “Ocean Observation Stakeholders' Dialogue: Priorities & Challenges for 2030”, held in Barcelona on April 8th.
Banner for the Ocean Decade Event

Data Grants Holders Workshop

The DTO-BioFlow Data Grants Holders Workshop is specifically tailored for representatives of the winning projects from our Open Call. This event focuses on equipping participants with the necessary skills to reformat and implement quality control on their data, aligning with international standards, and ensuring their work contributes effectively to EMODnet Biology.

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Nine projects have been selected to makepreviously inaccessible biodiversity data from a broad spectrum of sources available for long-term ingestion via EMODnet Biology.
Banner Marine Biodiversity data holders
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On March 6th, 2024, the DTO-BioFlow project took part in the VLIZ Marine Science Day 2024, framing the Belgian presidency of the Council of the EU and emphasizing global initiative

banner VMSD

Strandaanspoelsel (beach washup) Monitoring Project (SMP)

Beneficiary: stichting ANEMOON

The SMP was started in 1997 to track changes in populations of organisms along the Dutch coastline and is carried out by volunteer observers (citizen scientists). These observers walk a fixed SMP route (SMP-traject) along the beach once every two or four weeks at low tide at one of our fourteen SMP-trajects along the Dutch shoreline.
They register all washed-ashore organisms and/or their remains. These data are used to calculate trends and indicate changes in the species populations living...Read more

The SMP was started in 1997 to track changes in populations of organisms along the Dutch coastline and is carried out by volunteer observers (citizen scientists). These observers walk a fixed SMP route (SMP-traject) along the beach once every two or four weeks at low tide at one of our fourteen SMP-trajects along the Dutch shoreline.
They register all washed-ashore organisms and/or their remains. These data are used to calculate trends and indicate changes in the species populations living in the nearshore zone.

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KAIROS - ZooplanKton data from Arctic marIne time-seRies to understand biOdiversity dynamicS

Beneficiary: Institute of Polar Sciences, National Research Council (ISP-CNR)

The Arctic is a climate change hot spot, with ocean warming, freshening, sea-ice decline, linked to changing atmospheric and terrestrial environments. These processes are imprints of Atlantification, a progressive propagation of the Atlantic signal into the Arctic Ocean, significantly influencing climate, ecosystems, and marine food web. In the Svalbard archipelago global warming is notably accelerated.
In 2010, the first deployment of Mooring Dirigibile Italia (MDI) in Kongsfjorden, signi...Read more

The Arctic is a climate change hot spot, with ocean warming, freshening, sea-ice decline, linked to changing atmospheric and terrestrial environments. These processes are imprints of Atlantification, a progressive propagation of the Atlantic signal into the Arctic Ocean, significantly influencing climate, ecosystems, and marine food web. In the Svalbard archipelago global warming is notably accelerated.
In 2010, the first deployment of Mooring Dirigibile Italia (MDI) in Kongsfjorden, significantly influenced by Atlantic Waters (AW) intrusion, permitted continuous physical and biological measurements addressing climate changes. This initiative evolved into the Italian Arctic Marine Observing System, enabling comprehensive observation of western coastal dynamics along the Svalbard through five observing sites.
Since 2010 to present, the oceanographic moorings have been continuously gathering year-round data of environmental parameters and automatically collecting zooplankton and sinking particles samples using time-series sediment traps. Trapcollected zooplankton samples (TCZs) have been analysed over 13-years (2010- 2023), considering zooplankton abundance, fluxes, and taxonomic composition linked to thermohaline measurements, and revealing seasonal and longer-term biodiversity dynamics.
Despite possible discrepancies with actual abundances, TCZs prove valuable for investigating biodiversity in ice-covered regions, where conventional plankton net samplings face challenges. Long-term TCZ data from MDI provide insights into deepsea zooplankton distribution, diversity and ecology, and assess temporal dynamics and variability of zooplankton fluxes, composition and structure in relation to environmental changes. However, these data are currently poorly accessible in public domains, and the lack of standardised guidelines for their organisation and description significantly hampers their findability, accessibility, interoperability, and reusability (FAIR). The primary objective of KAIROS is to unlock 8-years (2014-2022) of TCZs data, adopting FAIR principles and sharing them as OPEN data. Focusing on data curation and harmonisation, KAIROS will primarily involve meticulous data review, formatting, quality control, validation and adoption of standards to improve data interoperability. KAIROS will also update and integrate the existing TCZs data with trait-based data: morpho-functional information, developmental stage and other relevant ecological traits where possible.
KAIROS will finally link TCZ data with environmental data (e.g., temperature, salinity, organic carbon fluxes, 𐋿13Corg, etc..) retrieved at the same time and location, and already available, for a better understanding of zooplankton dynamics in the Arctic Ocean. This integrated approach, bolstered by the development of FAIR and OPEN datasets of TCZs and associated environmental data from MDI, aims to assess how oceanographic changes affect zooplankton fluxes in Kongsfjorden and predict the future of the Svalbard ecosystem and zooplankton biodiversity under the pressure of climate change and Atlantification.
Data management and FAIRification processes will be achieved following broadly shared guidelines and existing web services and tools provided by e-Science European infrastructures for biodiversity and ecosystem research (e.g., EMODnet Biology, LifeWatch ERIC, OBIS, etc...). The harmonised and FAIR (meta)data will be published on EMODnet Biology. Moreover, the (meta)data will also be exposed on LifeWatch Italy in order to increase their accountability and visibility at the national level, and guarantee the long-term sustainability of the data.OOS BIOWG best practice document.

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Managing and publishing biodiversity data from Nord University

Beneficiary: Nord University

Nord University initiated a standardised zooplankton biannual time-series in 1980, now replicated in three fjords. More recently, a benthos time-series and two livestreaming undersea videos have been established. Funding has also been obtained to develop automated image analysis (AI) of these samples. However, to date, there is no organized system for biodiversity data management from data recording to archiving, which complicates data publication. This project would hire a post-doctoral leve...Read more

Nord University initiated a standardised zooplankton biannual time-series in 1980, now replicated in three fjords. More recently, a benthos time-series and two livestreaming undersea videos have been established. Funding has also been obtained to develop automated image analysis (AI) of these samples. However, to date, there is no organized system for biodiversity data management from data recording to archiving, which complicates data publication. This project would hire a post-doctoral level researcher to develop this system, train associated staff, write a user manual, and demonstrate biodiversity data publication into EMODnet Biology.

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Integration of southeastern Mediterranean long-term biodiversity data into EU-DTO

Beneficiary: Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research

The Israeli territorial waters and its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) are delimited by a rectangular polygon parallel to the shore and spans the depth range of 0-2000 m and an area of ~26,000 square Km. In 2023, The Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research (IOLR) opened a publicly available database, designated ISRAMARBIO, which is aimed at including all the biotic data collected in the last ~130 years along the Mediterranean waters of Israel as well as selected adjacent interesting site...Read more

The Israeli territorial waters and its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) are delimited by a rectangular polygon parallel to the shore and spans the depth range of 0-2000 m and an area of ~26,000 square Km. In 2023, The Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research (IOLR) opened a publicly available database, designated ISRAMARBIO, which is aimed at including all the biotic data collected in the last ~130 years along the Mediterranean waters of Israel as well as selected adjacent interesting sites located in the South Eastern part of the Mediterranean. A substantial part of this data, detailed below, was already deposited in our database, but not all of it. The database is aimed at providing data and research tools for long-term bio-geographic and ecological studies as well as background data for assisting governmental policymakers to establish educated environmental policy. The east edge of the Mediterranean was less documented than its west part and introducing this database to EMODnet biology and eventually to the Digital Twin Ocean (DTO) system would improve the digital ocean model and our knowledge of the Mediterranean biodiversity. Data sources for ISRAMARBIO are peer-reviewed publications in international languages but also samples that were obtained in the framework of dissertations and local monitoring programs written in Hebrew or English and are not internationally available. Detailed description of ISRAMARBIO was published in “Tom, M., Lubinevsky, H., Kanari, M. 2023. Integrative data system for monitoring biota and natural habitats in the Israeli Eastern Mediterranean marine environment. Environ. Monit. Assess. 195, 1068,”
The database is built on a publicly accessed Geographic Information System-Based (GIS) online platform (ESRI, USA) supported by a virtual Windows server 2012R2 which stores a variety of textual and pictorial documents. The link to the public site is: https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/40e86605ff4d4e5096ed2c901fec2a2f. Each biotic data item is termed a record and every record is composed of sampled taxon which is part of a single sample. The taxon name is accompanied by ~50 descriptive items divided into taxonomy information with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) as a reference, quantitative information if exists, documentation and formal information, sampling location, time and date, processing information and bio-geographic origin. Due to GIS limitations, the records are
arranged in three assemblies devoted to point, line and polygon samples. In addition to the biotic information, the database includes habitats’ map of the Israeli waters and several auxiliary GIS map layers including hill-shade, nature reserves and protected marine areas, human interference areas and sites and contour layer.
The aim of the present project is to integrate ISRAMARBIO biotic data with EMODnet biology and consequently with DTO, establishing flow of biotic data deposited in ISRAMARBIO to the EU system. Definition of east Mediterranean marine habitats is not yet established in the European system (EUNIS) and their integration into it could be also a potential goal of the project, depending on EUNIS consent. IOLR is already a member of EMODnet, continuously providing oceanographic and bathymetric data to its depositories.

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Pipeline for biodiversity data from the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) to the OBIS network and EMODnet.

Beneficiary: National Oceanography Centre

While BODC is a key provider of physical, geophysical and biogeochemical data to EMODnet Physics, Bathymetry and Chemistry, we do not currently have the capacity to easily provide biodiversity data to EurOBIS and EMODnet Biology. The reason for this is that the Darwin Core Archive (DwCA) format was never integrated into BODC’s basic workflows. BODC manages and ingests plankton and, to a lesser extent benthos data, alongside concomitant environmental measurements, into its databases, but there...Read more

While BODC is a key provider of physical, geophysical and biogeochemical data to EMODnet Physics, Bathymetry and Chemistry, we do not currently have the capacity to easily provide biodiversity data to EurOBIS and EMODnet Biology. The reason for this is that the Darwin Core Archive (DwCA) format was never integrated into BODC’s basic workflows. BODC manages and ingests plankton and, to a lesser extent benthos data, alongside concomitant environmental measurements, into its databases, but there is currently no mechanism to make these data available in DwCA format.
Furthermore, the publication pipelines put in place at BODC over the last 15 years to replace CD-ROM publication, are not well suited to biodiversity data. As a result, these data are difficult to find and extract. Here we are proposing to lay down the foundations for a sustained data pipeline between BODC and the OBIS network (via the UK OBIS node and EurOBIS) so that current and future biodiversity data from UKfunded oceanographic research, but also from research activities within our parent organisation the National Oceanography Centre, including historical data collections and data collected using novel technologies, can make their way to OBIS, EMODnet and DTO using an efficient semi-automated workflow. As part of this project, and to test and demonstrate the pipeline, we will submit plankton abundance and biomass data from at least four datasets. We will also use this grant to train two members of staff in the management of biodiversity data according to international best practices, enabling them to become leaders in this area of work at the BODC.

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